GlutenFreeAZ.com Blog Subscription Update

Greetings!

I recently moved my blog over to it’s own hosted website, www.GlutenFreeAZ.com, and noticed that my subscribers were not getting blog posts emailed to them after the move. If you’d still like to be updated whenever I post news and information on gluten free and Celiac issues, please resubscribe yourself by clicking here. You’ll have the option to receive new blog posts by email, RSS feed, Google Reader, and many other convenient methods. I’d also like to take the opportunity to ask you to join my Facebook group or connect with me on Twitter so you can stay up-to-date with what’s going on in the gluten free/Celiac world. I plan to start doing more contests with local gluten free businesses, so stay tuned!

I hope to see you on my new site, www.GlutenFreeAZ.com!

Sincerely,

Jessica Fielding

@GlutenFreeAZ

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Put the Bun Back into Your Diet at Indulge

Gluten Free Three Cheese Grilled Cheese

Gluten Free Three Cheese Grilled Cheese

I came, I saw, and boy did I Indulge! I’m thrilled to finally find an upscale burger joint in the Valley that has such a great selection of gluten free options that won’t break the bank.

Most of my burger experiences have been disappointing at best since the bun was removed from my diet nearly 10 years ago when I found out I had Celiac. I consider myself lucky if I can find a restaurant that will do a lettuce wrap for me, but no more sad “protein style” burgers for me thanks to Indulge Burger! They offer a perfectly toasted gluten free burger courtesy of Gluten Free Creations Bakery and some delectable desserts to boot.

But they don’t stop at just burgers; their menu has a great variety of gluten free items depending on your mood. I loved the three cheese grilled cheese sandwich, french fries, and cheese burger that I shared with friends, but next time I’m going to try the chicken sandwich with the goat cheese spread on top. I can’t wait to bring my daughter here for the hot dog on a bun – she’s gluten free too and I don’t think she’s ever had the pleasure of eating one on a bun in her entire life (all 3 years of it).

The atmosphere during happy hour was very relaxed with great music playing in the background. The entire staff so was so friendly and most  importantly, very knowledgable about the gluten free menu. I had the chance to meet the owner, Lee, and he really makes every customer feel right at home. He himself is not Celiac, but you can tell that he is very proud about his gluten free menu and the variety he is able to offer to his customers.

The icing on the cake was the dessert menu though. They had several kinds of gluten free cupcakes to choose from plus an AMAZING cinnamon roll that had a perfectly ooey-gooey center. If you are on a gluten free diet then Indulge Burger needs to be added to your list of places to try.

Indulge Burgers & More

10392 North Scottsdale Road

Scottsdale, AZ 85253

(480) 998-2222

Open Mon-Thu 11am-9pm; Fri 11am-10pm; Sat 10am-10pm; Sun 10am-9pm

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U.S. Patent Awarded for “Enzyme treatment of foodstuffs for Celiac sprue”

A patent was filed with the US Patent and Trademark Office in 2007 by four scientists for an enzyme treatment of “foodstuffs” for Celiac sprue. The patent was finally awarded March 25th , 2011 to Stanford University in Palo Alto, CA. Patent #7,910,541, developed by four co-inventors, is listed as an “enzyme treatment of foodstuffs for Celiac sprue.” The co-inventors are Felix Hausch, Langenselbold, Germany, Gary Gray, Stanford, Calif., Lu Shan, Houston, and Chaitan Khosla, Palo Alto, Calif.

Could this be the long awaited Celiac cure or miracle pill for gluten intolerance? I’m trying to find more information on the research this group did and will post info when I find it. Stay tuned…this could get exciting.

Read the patent approval here.

 

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Gluten Free Pizza Options at Streets of New York

Streets of New York LogoI’ve driven by the Streets of New York for the last 5 years just wishing I could eat there. Even from down the road you can smell the aroma of garlic and freshly baked pizza and I lamented the fact that there was nothing on the menu that was within my diet. Fast forward 5 years and they now have a gluten free pizza menu as well as several appetizers available for those with Celiac or gluten sensitivity.

For starters, they offer a gluten free version of bruschetta as well as a spinach and artichoke dip that will nearly have you licking the plate. The spin-dip was by far my

Gluten Free Spinach and Artichoke Dip

Gluten Free Spinach and Artichoke Dip

favorite, boasting just enough vegetables to make you think you’re eating health food, but with a hearty helping of cheese to remind you that you’re actually indulging. We also ordered up a batch of their gluten free honey BBQ wings and my 3 year old couldn’t get enough of those, shrieking excitedly every time she licked the sweet sauce. Be sure to specify when you order wings that you need them prepared gluten free; they have a separate preparation process for gluten free wings to help reduce any possibility of cross contamination.

Streets of New York Gluten Free Prep Area Phoenix

Streets of New York Gluten Free Prep Area Phoenix

Let’s talk pizza: I’ve been eating a lot of it the last few years since more and more restaurants are now serving it. My main concern with many pizza places that sell gluten free is that they serve the crust, but don’t know squat about proper preparation techniques. Jimmy, the General Manager at the Camelback and 3rd St. location, gave me a tour of the kitchen on my recent visit. He showed me their gluten free preparation area, the separate tray and utensil storage area, and their cooler to show me that they follow recommended techniques to reduce the risk of cross contamination. Additionally, they use separate ingredients, racks, plates, gloves, and utensils to do their best to serve the Celiac and gluten free community. All locations have been trained on safe handling methods by Lynn Rae Ries of Gluten Free Creations, who also supplies their gluten free products.

We ordered 2 pizzas, both were 10 inch “personal” pizzas, but you could easily split one with a friend if you started with an appetizer. All ingredients tasted very fresh and the crust had a great texture, which is one of the hardest things to get right in the gluten free world. I personally like a combo of black olives, salami, and spinach, which won’t break the bank at around $15. My husband opted for a garlic chicken, peppers, and mushroom pizza, which was tasty as well. They will even deliver and offer catering of their gluten free items for the big game or an office party.

The atmosphere reminds me a lot of a pizza place in Boston my mom used to take me – the kind of place that you would go celebrate winning a soccer match with your team, go on a casual first date, or take the family out for Sunday lunch. After dark, the lights go down and the candles come out while their patio lights up with fairy lights.

The only thing I could suggest for Streets of New York is to add some gluten free offerings to the dessert menu (I’m a sucker for chocolate) and to add a gluten free beer or cider option to the drink menu. Overall, it was a great dining experience and I’m sure that my family will be back soon!

They have locations throughout Phoenix, Tempe, Mesa, Chandler, and even Las Vegas. Check them out: http://www.StreetsofNewYork.com

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New Research Identifies Difference Between Celiac & Gluten Sensitivity

This article was originally posted on the University of Maryland School of Medicine and gives great insight into the major difference between Celiac disease and gluten sensitivity.

Study from University of Maryland Center for Celiac Research Places Gluten Sensitivity on Center Stage of Spectrum of Gluten-Related Disorders

Scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine’s Center for Celiac Research have proven that gluten sensitivity is different from celiac disease at the molecular level and in the response it elicits from the immune system. The research, published online in BMC Medicine, provides the first scientific evidence of a different mechanism leading to gluten sensitivity. It also demonstrates that gluten sensitivity and celiac disease are part of a spectrum of gluten-related disorders.

“We found differences in levels of intestinal permeability and expression of genes regulating the immune response in the gut mucosa,” says lead investigator Alessio Fasano, M.D., professor of pediatrics, medicine and physiology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and director of the Center for Celiac Research. The research documents the genes and the pathways — a sequence of reactions in the small intestine — possibly associated with gluten sensitivity. “Identifying and isolating specific ‘biomarkers’ in the immune response of people with gluten sensitivity could lead to diagnostic tools for the condition,” says Dr. Fasano, who also directs the University of Maryland School of Medicine Mucosal Biology Research Center.

In people with celiac disease, gluten sets off an autoimmune reaction in the small intestine. The complex proteins found in wheat, rye and barley trigger the immune system of a person with celiac disease to attack the person’s small intestine. Left undiagnosed and untreated, celiac disease can lead to the development of other autoimmune disorders, as well as osteoporosis, infertility, neurological conditions and, in rare cases, cancer.

Unlike celiac disease, gluten sensitivity is not associated with these serious conditions. Common symptoms of gluten sensitivity include abdominal pain similar to irritable bowel syndrome, fatigue, headaches, “foggy mind” or tingling of the extremities. There is also evidence that a subgroup of schizophrenic patients and autistic children might be affected by gluten sensitivity.

The Center for Celiac Research estimates that approximately six percent of the U.S. population, or 18 million people, suffers from gluten sensitivity. This group reacts with some of the same symptoms as people with celiac disease, but gluten-sensitive individuals typically test negative for celiac disease in diagnostic blood tests and show no signs of the damage to the small intestine that defines celiac disease.

“Imagine gluten ingestion on a spectrum, says Dr. Fasano. “At one end, you have people with celiac disease, who cannot tolerate one crumb of gluten in their diet. At the other end, you have the lucky people who can eat pizza, beer, pasta and cookies — and have no ill effects whatsoever. In the middle, there is this murky area of gluten reactions, including gluten sensitivity. This is where we are looking for answers about how to best diagnose and treat this recently identified group of gluten-sensitive individuals,” says Dr. Fasano.

“The Center for Celiac Research is leading the way in the effort to better understand the spectrum of gluten disorders,” says E. Albert Reece, M.D., Ph.D., M.B.A, vice president for medical affairs, University of Maryland, and John Z. and Akiko K. Bowers Distinguished Professor and dean, University of Maryland School of Medicine. “I have no doubt that further research will lead to new diagnostic tools and treatments for those who suffer from gluten sensitivity.”

The latest research was conducted in collaboration with the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, the Department of Experimental Medicine of the University of Naples in Italy, and the Institute of Food Sciences in Avellino, Italy. The BMC Medicine article is titled “Divergence of Gut Permeability and Mucosal Immune Gene Expression in Two Gluten-Associated Conditions: Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity.”

The University of Maryland School of Medicine’s Center for Celiac Research has been at the forefront of education, research, diagnosis and treatment for more than a decade. A groundbreaking 2003 study conducted by the Center for Celiac Research estimated that 1 in 133 people in the United States suffers from the disease. In 2000 the Center for Celiac Research developed a diagnostic blood test that is used to identify the disease. Founded in 1995, the Center for Celiac Research is an international leader in promoting the awareness of celiac disease to provide better care, better quality of life, and more adequate support for the celiac disease community worldwide.

 

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Gluten Free Pumpkin Muffin Recipe

With the first hint of autumn air finally crawling into Phoenix, I decided it was time to whip up a batch of pumpkin muffins to satisfy my sweet tooth. I found a recipe I liked from Elana’s Pantry, but modified it slightly to make it a bit sweeter and increase the quantity. You can also add some fun ingredients like chocolate chips, nuts, or candy pieces if you want to make it even sweeter. My 3 year old likes to add “mushalooms”, also known in English as marshmallows, to make it a sweet after school treat!

Gfree Pumpkin Muffins

Gluten Free Pumpkin Muffins

1/4 teaspoon Xanthum gum
1¼ teaspoon salt
1  teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1 pinch ground cloves
1/4 cup sugar or Splenda (More if you want sweeter muffins)
4 tablespoons oil
1 cup Margarita Sensations agave nectar
4 large eggs
2 cups pumpkin, well packed
1/4 – 1/2 cup applesauce (for moisture)

  1. In a large bowl combine almond flour, salt, sugar, baking soda, cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger and cloves
  2. In a blender puree oil, agave, eggs, applesauce, and pumpkin until smooth
  3. Stir wet ingredients into dry
  4. Place paper liners in cupcake pan
  5. Scoop batter into paper liners
  6. Bake at 350° for 15-20 minutes testing with a fork to see if center is cooked

Makes about 18 muffins

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Study shows celiac disease can develop later in life – USA Today

By Betty Klinck, USA TODAY – Originally published here.

Celiac disease, an autoimmune illness affecting about one in 133 Americans, is showing an increasing presence among the elderly, says a study released today. The study in the Annals of Medicine was led by the University of Maryland School of Medicine Center for Celiac Research.

Celiac disease damages the small intestine because of an autoimmune reaction to gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley and rye — part of many common products such as bread, pasta and cookies. Symptoms include diarrhea, abdominal cramping and bloating.

The study followed 3,511 volunteers who submitted blood samples in 1974 and 1989, and updates every two to three years until 2007. This study adds weight to the concept that celiac disease can emerge at any age, because researchers surveyed the same people over time, says Joseph Murray, a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist.

Researchers found that the incidence of celiac disease doubled every 15 years since 1974 and that the incidence increased as subjects aged, with some developing the disease in their 50s or 60s.

If someone can be gluten-tolerant for 40 or 50 years before developing celiac disease, then environmental factors may outweigh genetic causes for the disease, says Alessio Fasano, director of the Center for Celiac Research, which led the study.

Fasano says that other unknown environmental changes and changes in “the composition of bacteria in our guts” may be causing gluten autoimmunity to present itself later in life.

If scientists can understand that process, they may be able to “develop a way to keep autoimmune disease on hold, ” says Fasano.

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Gluten Free Eating in Paris

I’ve been trying to eat gluten free in Paris for the last 3 days now, and have to say it’s been more of a challenge than I thought it would be. It has been torture every time I walk past a patisserie full of croissants and pain au chocolats and not being able to eat the foods that I used to indulge in during my pre-Celiac days. Worse though, is finding something convenient and gluten free that my 3 year old daughter will eat in Paris – that has been a challenge in its own right. Man cannot live on French Fries alone … or can he?

Breakfast at our hotel has been a total lifesaver for us, and we’ve been really taking advantage of the “all you can eat” in the all you can eat buffet. It’s a nice change to start out the day with meats, cheese, bacon, and yogurt. Yes, there is probably cross contamination, but at least it gives me tons of energy for a day of walking to see the sites. I brought a loaf of Ener-G “sans gluten” Tapioca bread with me from the states and it’s been my saving grace. I may be the only person in the world to eat peanut butter and jelly two times a day in Paris, but hey, it’s calories. And I’ve grown to like my mid-afternoon nutella sandwhich – who wouldn’t!

I have had two very amazing meals out with a local friend, who helped us talk about what items will be safer for me to eat. Were they actually Gluten free? Probably not, but the closest I think it was going to get – and the meals were absolutely magnifique!

I finally found myself a “biologique” today, the equivalent of small health food store, and loaded up on a variety of gluten free snacks and treats. The best surpirse was buying a fresh loaf of gluten free bread! It’s ten times better than US stuff…made with quinoa and has a great texture that mimics french bread somewhat. This at least gives me something to eat for dinner – I’m off to find some brie and veggies to make myself a sandwich!

Au revior!

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Eating Gluten Free in Paris

Jessica & Kendall in Paris

Jessica & Kendall in Paris

I’ve been trying to eat gluten free in Paris for the last 3 days now, and have to say it’s been more of a challenge than I thought it would be. It has been torture every time I walk past a patisserie full of croissants and pain au chocolats and not being able to eat the foods that I used to indulge in during my pre-Celiac days. Worse though, is that finding something convenient and gluten free that my 3 year old daughter will eat in Paris – that has been a challenge in its own right. Man cannot live on French Fries alone … or can he?

Breakfast at our hotel has been a total lifesaver for us, and we’ve been really taking advantage of the “all you can eat” in the all you can eat buffet. It’s a nice change to start out the day with meats, cheese, bacon, and yogurt.  Yes, there is probably cross contamination, but at least it gives me tons of energy for a day of walking to see the sites. I brought a loaf of Ener-G “sans gluten” Tapioca bread with me from the states and it’s been my saving grace. I may be the only person in the world to eat peanut butter and jelly two times a day in Paris, but hey, it’s calories. And I’ve grown to like my mid-afternoon nutella sandwhich – who wouldn’t!

I have had two very amazing meals out with a local friend, who helped us talk about what items will be safer for me to eat. Were they actually Gluten free? Probably not, but the closest I think it was going to get – and the meals were absolutely magnifique!

I finally found myself a “biologique” today, the equivalent of small health food store, and loaded up on a variety of gluten free snacks and treats. The best surpirse was buying a fresh loaf of gluten free bread! It’s ten times better than US stuff…made with quinoa and has a great texture that mimics french bread somewhat. This at least gives me something to eat for dinner – I’m off to find some brie and veggies to make myself a sandwich!

Au revior!

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Happy National Celiac Awareness Day!

Gluten Free AZ Logo

September 13 is National Celiac Awareness Day! The first annual Celiac Disease Awareness Day Resolution was passed in 2006 by the United States Senate (S.Res. 563). This bill, sponsored by Senator James Inhofe of Oklahoma, instigated by one of his staff members with celiac disease and co-sponsored by Senator Ben Nelson of Nebraska, made September 13, 2006 National Celiac Disease Awareness Day. This date was chosen because is it is the date of Samuel Gee’s birthday, who is credited with being the first person to find a link between celiac disease and diet. Gee once said “if the patient can be cured at all, it must be by means of diet.”

Take some time today to celebrate with some gluten free cupcakes or just by talking to others about Celiac Disease and the gluten free diet.

Learn More about Samuel Gee at:
http://osiris.sunderland.ac.uk/~cs0rel/hist.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Gee
http://www.coeliac.co.uk/coeliac_disease/68.asp
http://www.whonamedit.com/doctor.cfm/1312.html
http://www.aim25.ac.uk/cgi-bin/search2?coll_id=7101&inst_id=8

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